Job and Career Planning for Teens

Hi Everyone,

Welcome to Wanda Luthman’s Children’s Book Blog.

Today, I’m having our favorite Child Psychologist, Dr. Valerie Allen, share a topic for our teens…

Job and Career Planning for Teens
by
Dr. Valerie Allen

As teenagers progress through high school their career plans may boarder on whimsical, fantasy, or the far fetched. Parents, don’t be alarmed! What must Mrs. Disney have thought as her little boy, Walter, kept drawing all those mice? It’s good to think big and plan accordingly, however, it’s also important to consider “Plan B,” just in case fame and fortune doesn’t come overnight for your special teenager.

Arts and Humanities: skilled production of creation and/or presentations for aesthetic appreciation and/or recognition. Think: artists, creative writers, journalists, musicians, entertainers

Construction: processes in the building trades which help citizens in their living environment and life styles to meet their needs. Think: architects, civil engineers, mechanical engineers, tradesmen, .

Education: application of knowledge in research and helping individuals in gaining skills and techniques necessary to accomplish tasks. Think: professors, teachers, trainers, researchers.

Government: developing and enforcing the system of community living at the local, state, and national levels and regulation of quality standards for the production of goods and services. Think: politicians, lawyers, judges, law enforcement, policy makers, city planners.

Health and Welfare: maintaining the physical and mental well-being of humans, as well as being active in the care of animals as they impact on the overall well-being of society. Think: medical field, mental health professionals, case workers, veterinarians, personal trainers, life coaches.

Manufacturing: the design and production of goods and materials in an effort to make a product suitable for consumer use. Think: factory production of parts and pieces, heavy equipment, machinists, factory workers, assembly line.

Personal Services: aiding individuals in their daily life functions as related to their needs and desires. Think: direct patient care, case workers, vocational/career guidance workers, barbers, cosmetologists, health and beauty spas.

Product Services: the repair and maintenance of goods being used by the consumer. Think: auto   services, appliance repairs, mechanical engineers, infrastructure maintenance, utility workers.

Natural Resources: the management of environmental reserves in the production of goods and materials to satisfy the needs and wants of the consumer. Think: forest workers, fish and wildlife officers, pollution control, waste management workers, recycle and re-purpose workers.

Recreation and Entertainment: the application of artistic skills and talents for an individual’s own pleasure and/or the pleasure of others. Think: sports, spas, gyms, playgrounds, zoos, culture, entertainment.

Trade and Finance: involves the process of exchange of goods and services as well as monetary services, to aid both the producer and the consumer personally or professionally. Think: banking, investing, insurance, real estate, stock market, bookkeepers, accountants, loan officers

Transportation and Communication: the transfer of goods and people by air, land, or water and the transmission of information throughout the community and world society.  Think: airline pilots, boat captions, train conductors, big rig drivers, bus drivers, computer/IT workers

All jobs are classified into one of three categories; those involving people, data, or things. There is,  of course, overlap but the basic focus of a job is in one of these three classifications. This list of career clusters would be helpful to assist your teen to explore where his or her skills and interests might be found. You can use this information as a good talking point with your teen.

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Dr. Valerie Allen is a child psychologist in private practice. She has written a work book for teens and parents, “Go to the Guidance Office and Ask the Counselor About Career Choices.” Amazon.com/dp/B08L5LKZ86
She has also published two children’s chapter books, “Summer School for Smarties” and “Bad Hair, Good Hat, New
Friends ” and a picture book for beginning readers, “The Sun and The Moon.” Amazon.com/author/valerieallen.
Oh yes, she has also raised six children from whom she has learned many things about life and love.

Thank you, Dr. Allen, for being a guest on my blog today and helping parents everywhere help their child be a success!

As always likes, comments, and shares are appreciated!

Thank you everyone for reading my blog.

Stay safe

6 thoughts on “Job and Career Planning for Teens

  1. I think that the Fourth Industrial Revolution is a big factor in the future of jobs. I am encouraging my boys to go into IT programming. I don’t believe that auditors and accountants as I know them and as I am, will exist in the future in the same way.

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  2. I found your blog interesting but I would like to see more attention given to plan B both for the UK and the US and at a younger age. The same way children recognise the American flag, so we should give them a greater awareness of the real world – the one outside the school gates where you have to earn enough money to keep you in sickness and in health. Here in the UK we are failing badly in this. They manage to do it in Japan and other Asian countries but not here.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Barbara, thank you for stopping by my blog and leaving a comment. Are you talking about giving students more information on normal day to day life and how to make a living vs preparing for college?

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      1. The importance of going through life knowing that you will need a job, and creating the necessary skills to do that. You mention artists – I know 3 who illustrated my books. 2 were university graduates – one ended up in a shop, another working her way up into an ad agency – and the third who had never bothered to learn anything but art, had nothing to offer.

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